ealperin

ealperin:

captkylej:

confusiongrows:

part2of3:

Superman the animated series

S2E27: Little Girl Lost part 1

really? a different hairstyle and a pair of glasses? you really think that’s going to fool anybody? that’s got the stupidest disguise i’ve ever… oh, right… never mind. 

I would just like to take this moment not only to say I really like that scene but also to mention that it’s a damn good episode and you should watch the whole thing right now.

At least Kara was smart enough to wear a wig so her hair was completely different. Clark’s just relying on how stupid Metropolis is to get by.

Well…

Technically, Supergirl wore a wig, since, all the way back in 1959, to hide her blonde hair, as Supergirl, when she was staying at the Midvale Orphanage:

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Action Comics #252

May of 1959

"The Supergirl From Krypton!"

Written by Otto Binder, & art by the late Al Plastino

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 (1970’s) Adventure Comics #395:

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Written by Bob Kanigher and drawn by Kurt Schaffenberger

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It has since been a staple for her secret I.D. (for the most part)

In around 1982, she opted for a magic comb that switched up, both her style & hairdo. (I’ll let your imagination run with with that one. ^___-)

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THEN, when, Supergirl: The Movie, came around: Helen Slater wore a wig as Linda:

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Promo photo

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But, we never see where the wig goes when she turns into Supergirl:

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Her hair was like this at the beginning of the film:

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This is her as Supergirl:

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Now, fast forwards to around 1996, where, Peter David, basically, merged the classic Linda (Lee) Danvers character along with the Matrix Supergirl:

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Supergirl #1

Written by Peter David

Art by Gary Frank

Peter was inspired by this panel, where Kara refers to herself as a “Guardian Angel”:

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 Action Comics #252 (circa 1959)

Written by Otto Binder

Art by Al Plastino

Mixing in those two folks, added a new power to her repertoire, giving her the power to shapeshift from Linda to Supergirl & back again:

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Supergirl #7

Written by Peter David

Art by Gary Frank, here.

BUT, by the time #50 rolled around, the character was depowered:

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& a switch was made, both in her costume & about her hair, in #51:

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Peter David & Leonard Kirk on writing, & art credits, respectively, for both issues #50 & #51.

Look familiar?

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Yep.

You’re not seeing things, don’t worry.

;)

I talked with Peter David about this, & he said that around the time that this show was airing, the higher ups & DC wanted to start Supergirl off with a clean slate & they asked Peter David if he could put a reason behind the costume change, so, there you go with that costume change!

Now, there have been MANY variations of her hair, throughout the years, but, I’ll add in some recent one’s, for you:

In Supergirl: Cosmic Adventures in 8th Grade #1, by Landry Walker, art by Eric Jones, Superman gives Kara eyeglasses, but, her hair doesn’t really change- much:

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In Supergirl #34, via Sterling Gates & Jamal Igle (on art), Kara gets her glasses, which were Conner’s, from Tim:

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But, in the final pages, of #34, we see Lana helping her out, much to Clark’s surprise, creating an alias for her:

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Her hair’s in a ponytail, as Linda Lang:

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Supergirl #35

Written by Sterling Gates

Art by Jamal Igle

See?

^_____^

Now, for the final bit, which I’ll add, here:

In the Smallville episode, Supergirl, we saw Laura Vandervoort’s, don a wig, circa the 1970’s Linda, in regards to both hairstyle & outfit, here, apparently, & is, almost unrecognizable, in her last few scenes, onscreen,  in her secret identity. (And that’s a good thing!):

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Found here

WHEW!

So, there you have it!

A somewhat comprehensive guide to Supergirl & hair.

Mis-Adventures in Teaching

My journey in the Master of Arts in Teaching program recently came to an end.  Unfortunately, my time in the program did not work out.  The mandatory teaching internship in a Baltimore City high school proved difficult.  Everything I had learned in my coursework for the degree seemed to not comport with the learning environment I found myself in.  A minority of students in the classes continually interrupted me as I talked or drove my lessons off track.  Additionally, many students had cell phones they used during class time.  In my coursework, I was told to set clear, concise classroom rules for students.  Yet my mentor teacher did not incorporate clear, concise rules for his classes.  I considered using positive reinforcements like prizes or extra points to help with classroom management.  But I was told in the past those things never worked with students.  I witnessed very little disciplining of students.  Student lateness seemed to be my mentor teacher’s main concern.  My mentor frequently phoned the families of students when their child was late for class.  This act did not seem to help at all since students where perpetually late, especially in first period.  I was frustrated by all this.  Early on in the internship, I was told my mentor to forget what I read in my textbooks.  This advice discouraged me greatly.  The worst event during my internship was being informed by my mentor that during the previous school term ten adults had said that they were not concerned about their child’s behavior and progress in class.  Everything in my textbooks said that teacher-student-family relationships are vital to learning.  My mentor presented a different reality.  After nearly two months in my internship, I left.  I had to do what was in my best interests.  Teaching was not for me.  My internship experiences presented a world so different from the textbooks.  Also, the internship was so unlike my tutoring sessions.  One-on-one sessions allow you as the instructor to forge a learning relationship with the student.  I was overwhelmed trying to build learning relationships with 28 to 30 students in a class.  Teaching involves skills and a mentality I don’t possess.  I wish I could have discovered this earlier in the program, and not towards the end.  I was so eager to start a career instead of just going to a job with no advancement opportunities.  I wanted to live in my own place.  Maybe I was blinded by these desires when I choose a career path without really knowing what it entailed.  I just wanted an exit from the job I had where I could not use the skills from my history degree.  In the months after I left my internship, I had time to think about my future.  I decided to become a paralegal.  I want this career to be my new reality.  Thank you to anyone who reads this!  I just needed to write my experiences over the past months to make sense of it all.